A Journey of Healing

in the Most Natural Way 

 

Suffering is a given; suffering alone is intolerable.

Sue Johnson

  • Raya

Tanya on Women in Leadership

Updated: Feb 28

GENDER EQUALITY


"When a male leader is clear, decisive, up front and transparent, he is called a good, strong leader. When a woman demonstrates the same exact behaviors, she is called difficult or a b**ch (forgive the French). Nothing is truer than this. It took me a long time to realize that while this is unfair, at the end of the day, your work and the quality of your delivery really underlines your value and strength."


"I am an Executive Vice President for Client Operations in Teleperformance - the largest BPO service provider in the world. I have responsibility and overall oversight on the end to end business delivery which includes, but not limited to financial performance management, client interaction and relationship building and more importantly, employee satisfaction."


"50% of our frontline workforce are female between the ages of 23-28. As soon as they move up the ranks, we start to see that number dwindle. At the Sr Leadership level, we only see 20% of our leaders to be female, and at the Executive team where I belong, that’s 11% or to be more clear, 1 person, that being me."


"When men feel that they tick 60% of the job requirement, they present themselves to be capable. Women on the other hand, need to tick 100% of the boxes before we even think of applying. Second, there’s very little role modeling. Few women are the in the senior leadership roles; therefore, younger women have a hard time seeing themselves in these positions as well."


"Third, for TP Philippines more specifically, the internal survey that we conducted showed family obligations as a major driver. When men were asked who they would default child care to, the answer was an overwhelming – wife. When women were asked the same question, only 10% said husbands. The rest needed to look for other family members, 3rd party help, others."


"Put together, all these reasons mean companies need to do more of ensuring women have the skills for the job, that they know they have the skills and that our outlook on work hours vs output needs to be changed."


"At the end of the day, your work and the quality of your delivery really underlines your value and strength."

"I think in the Philippines “breaking the glass ceiling” is not so much of a thing as it is in other countries. As an example, while the US has had zero US Female Presidents, we’ve had 2. I feel it is reflective of our society and how biases, while still existing, are not as magnified. Corporate-wise however, it has come to the forefront of non-negotiables, and everyone is fighting for a place on being called a gender equal company."


PERSONAL JOURNEY AS A LEADER


"My mother, for as long as I can remember, had always evangelized the need for me to earn my own money. My dad, on the other hand, as I grew up sandwiched between 2 brothers, had never treated me any different. When they go out at night, he had no choice but to let me. When they were allowed to drive, I had to be allowed to drive. These are the little things that formed who I am….I think."


"Molding empowered women starts at home. It doesn’t start at the job site. It starts with loving Mothers who encourage their daughters to do more, better, and Fathers who allow their daughters to make a choice for themselves."

"Molding empowered women starts at home. It doesn’t start at the job site. It starts with loving Mothers who encourage their daughters to do more, better, and Fathers who allow their daughters to make a choice for themselves."

"There were 2 things that I had always been insecure with when I was starting. My educational background and age. I was a wide-eyed 24 year old hired as a Supervisor when I transferred to Manila and started my career in Business Process Outsourcing. It was a time when one couldn’t get a job in the bigger non-bpo corporations like Procter and Gamble or Ayala Corporation if you weren’t a Manila-based University graduate."


"I was Public School taught all through High School as well as being born and raised in the province. When I started in the BPO, I realized I was competing with people who graduated in the bigger, more popular schools like The Ateneo, UP and La Salle."


"As I started proving myself, I raised through the ranks fast and got promoted at average, once every year. That means at 28, I was a General Manager. That makes me a very young member of the Senior Leadership Team. It was difficult to sit in boardrooms with clients twice or thrice my age and convince them that I was worthy. That I actually knew what I was talking about."


"I remember a time when every big client visit, I would shop for clothes that would make me look older. I’d wear heavy makeup to make me look mature, and hope that maybe it would carry me and add to my credibility. Interestingly enough, gender was never an issue and I never felt marginalized for that."


"I must’ve been the few lucky ones to have never felt marginalized because of my gender. I’ve never reported to a female in my life and each time I grew it was because of strong confident male that saw my potential, and gave me the opportunity even when I didn’t think I had it to do the job."

"The fight for gender equality is not entirely in the hands of women. The men who are currently in the decision-making positions need to be on board and see the value it brings."

"This here underlines for me that the fight for gender equality is not entirely in the hands of women. The men who are currently in the decision-making positions need to be on board and see the value it brings."


WOMEN EMPOWERMENT


"Learn and get the skills. Find a role model and ask to be mentored. Understand that you don’t need to check 100% of the boxes to be ready. 60% will suffice. You will learn the rest – just like the men do.


"Believe that you’re just as good and if they can do it, you can. Flex that muscle when you get the chance to. What’s the worst that can happen? You’ll fail? That’s great, you can start over and learn again!"


"For a leader to be effective, you have to understand the business. Inspire. People need to know that they are part of a team and that you have their backs. Recognize strengths and celebrate! Passion, commitment and grit. That’s all it takes."

It is imperative that the few women in leadership allow themselves to become role models."

"Study after study will tell us that Women provides balance. The difference in perspective and insight allows company to think outside of what they’ve been used to and therefore can explore and excel in areas where they’ve never been able to before."


"Knowing that, it is important that we pave the way today for young women to be equipped, to ensure we provide the skills and help build their confidence that they can do it. It is imperative that the few women in leadership allow themselves to become role models."


LEVERAGING CHANGE


"Policies need to be changed and work expectations need to be more agile. Men can’t be expected to recognize and change these for women. These changes need to be drafted and implemented in the eyes of women; therefore, it is extremely important to ensure equal representation."


"In the immediate term, recruiters and hiring managers need to stop looking at job titles as a requirement. Studies show that women have in the past taken the job and delivered the same expectations without the title (we all just kind of trudged on and did what was asked of us). It is extra work but well worth it."

"Recruiters and hiring managers need to stop looking at job titles as a requirement."

"As for society, women really do need to support other women better. There are no bigger critics than our fellow women today.  We need to cut us some slack and celebrate wins as well as help resolve losses so we gain better confidence to want to try again."


"The reason why organizations need to strive for parity is  because men and women are built to be different. The only thing worse than an all-male team is an all-female team. There has to be a balance of thoughts, ideas, personalities. All that together makes up a great team."


"I am currently a member of the Teleperformance’ Women Global Board and leads the effort in the Philippines. We are on the lookout for Leadership trainings designed for women as well as a good mentorship program. If there is any out there that you or anyone know of, we would like to hear more about it as we build the #TPWomen program in the Philippines and beyond!"


The only thing worse than an all-male team is an all-female team. There has to be a balance of thoughts, ideas, personalities. All that together makes up a great team."
"With all of the men I had reported to in the last 9 years and gave me all of the opportunities."

"With my boys. At the end of the day, for me, the real struggle is not in women leadership. That one has come easy for me. My real struggle is in raising 2 boys who will one day recognize the strength of women through me and my ability to juggle both a career and motherhood today."

Deeply moved by the bestselling book (that started off as a blog), Humans of New York Stories, I am making space for little stories from real people to spur me into thinking about and doing constructive things. We all have stories to tell, and they do carry a lot of weight. May the words and insights from these Little Stories translate into some form of hope, courage, and change above all else. ~Raya

 
  • Instagram

©2018 by A 100 and 10 Years.